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World Pharma News
  • Researchers make key malarial drug-resistence finding
    According to the World Health Organization's 2014 World Malaria Report, there are an estimated 198 million cases of malaria worldwide with 3.3 billion people at risk for contracting the infection. Although the impact of malaria is still significant, the statistics reflect a considerable reduction in the global malaria burden.

  • Certain genes might make some people more prone to experience the placebo effect
    Researchers are beginning to explore whether the genetics of patients who experience a placebo effect are different from those of patients who don't. It's well known that people can feel better if they believe they are receiving treatment, but the biological pathways involved are relatively unexplored.

  • New WHO statement on public reporting of clinical trial results announced
    The World Health Organization (WHO) have announced a new statement on the public disclosure of clinical trial results which updates and expands a previous statement that noted the "the registration of all interventional trials is a scientific, ethical, and moral responsibility." The new statement includes timelines by which researchers are expected to report clinical trials results.

  • AstraZeneca and PatientsLikeMe announce global research collaboration
    AstraZenecaIn a major step forward to make patient-centric evidence a cornerstone of scientific discovery and development, AstraZeneca and PatientsLikeMe have signed a five-year agreement to provide access to PatientsLikeMe’s global network in support of AstraZeneca's patient-driven research initiatives.

  • Novo Nordisk opens new insulin formulation and filling facility in Russia
    Novo NordiskToday, Novo Nordisk opens a new manufacturing facility in Russia for formulation and filling of modern insulin for the treatment of diabetes. The production will cover both Penfill® cartridges and FlexPen® prefilled insulin injection pens for the Russian market.

  • UTMB researchers develop Ebola vaccine effective in a single dose
    An interdisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Profectus BioSciences, Inc. has developed a quick-acting vaccine that is both safe and effective with a single dose against the Ebola strain that killed thousands of people in West Africa last year.

  • Bayer Grants4Apps® Accelerator: Submissions Open for Digital Health Startups
    The Grants4Apps® Accelerator is a mentoring program for digital health startups taking place in Berlin. This year's batch with five startups runs from August 10th until December 4th, 2015. The program offers mentoring by entrepreneurs and Bayer experts, office space for 100 days at Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals headquarters, and funding of 50,000€.

  • UCB to focus on core business in India
    UCBIn line with its strategic focus, UCB announces it has entered an agreement with Dr. Reddy's to sell its established brands in India, including its franchises in the areas of allergies and respiratory disorders. The amount of the transaction amounts to INR 8000 million (~ €118 million).

  • Researchers question use of paracetamol for lower back pain and osteoarthritis
    New research shows that paracetamol is ineffective in reducing pain, disability or improving quality of life for patients who suffer from low back pain or osteoarthritis of the hip or knee, and its use may affect the liver. The study published in the British Medical Journal provides new evidence that paracetamol is no better at treating low back pain than a placebo and its effect on osteoarthritis of the hip or knee is too small to be clinically worthwhile.

  • To stop cancer: Block its messages
    The average living cell needs communication skills: It must transmit a constant stream of messages quickly and efficiently from its outer walls to the inner nucleus, where most of the day-to-day decisions are made. But this rapid, long-distance communication system leaves itself open to mutations that can give rise to a "spam attack" that promotes cancer.