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World Pharma News
  • Activating genes on demand
    When it comes to gene expression - the process by which our DNA provides the recipe used to direct the synthesis of proteins and other molecules that we need for development and survival - scientists have so far studied one single gene at a time. A new approach developed by Harvard geneticist George Church, Ph.D., can help uncover how tandem gene circuits dictate life processes, such as the healthy development of tissue or the triggering of a particular disease,

  • AstraZeneca completes acquisition of rights to Actavis’ branded respiratory portfolio in the US and Canada
    AstraZenecaAstraZeneca today announced that it has completed the transaction to acquire the rights to Actavis' branded respiratory business in the US and Canada. As previously announced, the strategic transaction strengthens AstraZeneca's respiratory franchise globally and builds on the acquisition of Almirall's respiratory portfolio in 2014

  • Novartis announces completion of transactions with GSK
    NovartisNovartis announced today that it has completed a series of transactions with GlaxoSmithKline plc (GSK), including the acquisition of certain oncology products and pipeline compounds from GSK, the creation of a world-leading consumer healthcare business through a joint venture that combines the two companies' consumer divisions, and the divestiture of the Novartis non-influenza Vaccines business to GSK.

  • Drug research and development more efficient than expected
    Drug R&D costs have increased substantially in recent decades, while the number of new drugs has remained fairly constant, leading to concerns about the sustainability of drug R&D and question about the factors that could be responsible. To investigate the efficiency in the development of new drugs, the researchers analyzed a data set consisting of new drugs approved by the FDA.

  • Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may control brain serotonin
    Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI), serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders.

  • Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy
    University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells. This new development opens up the possibility of preventing or treating a broad range of cancers, using a non-toxic material. Writing in the journal Oncotarget, the team of researchers led by Professor Michael Lisanti and Dr Aravind Vijayaraghavan has shown that graphene oxide, a modified form of graphene, acts as an anti-cancer agent that selectively targets cancer stem cells (CSCs).

  • Shire acquires Meritage Pharma
    ShireShire plc (LSE: SHP, NASDAQ: SHPG) and Meritage Pharma, Inc. announced today that Shire has acquired Meritage, a privately-held company, for an upfront fee of $70 million and additional contingent payments based on the achievement of development and regulatory milestones.

  • Novartis receives FDA approval of Farydak®, the first HDAC inhibitor for patients with multiple myeloma
    NovartisNovartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Farydak® (panobinostat, previously known as LBH589) capsules in combination with bortezomib* and dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least two prior regimens, including bortezomib and an immunomodulatory (IMiD) agent[1].

  • Safety and life-saving efficacy of statins have been exaggerated
    Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.

  • Palbociclib shows promise in patients with hormone-resistant breast cancer
    Palbociclib, an investigational oral medication that works by blocking molecules responsible for cancer cell growth, is well tolerated and extends progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed, advanced breast cancer patients, including those whose disease has stopped responding to traditional endocrine treatments.